Pennsylvania Dutch Hog Maw

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Pennsylvania Dutch Stuffed Pig Stomach Recipe

Pennsylvania Dutch Hog Maw Recipe (Stuffed Pig Stomach)

Pennsylvania Dutch Hog Maw
(Stuffed Pig Stomach)

Pennsylvania Dutch hog maw (stuffed pig stomach) is one of those special occasion dishes that has been served in my family for generations. Juices from succulent pork tenderloin, two types of sausage, potatoes, and cabbage unite as they bake inside this casing to create a marvelous entrée.

While it does not have the most appealing name, hog maw (or even worse, pig stomach) has incredibly appealing flavor. Smoked sausage gives it wonderful seasoning and a drizzle of cider vinegar adds a refreshing accent.

Served with a fresh green salad, this dish is a complete meal!

This hog maw recipe is easy to prepare and surprisingly quick to assemble, especially when you consider that it feeds eight to 10 people.

Note: if you partially freeze the fresh sausage for 30 minutes, it will be easier to slice.


Stuffed Pig Stomach
From the Kitchen of Helen Yeisley Miller, 1898 — 1962

Pig Stomach Stuffed With Sausage, Pork, Potatoes, and Cabbage

Pig Stomach Stuffed With Sausage, Pork, Potatoes, and Cabbage

  • 5 lbs potatoes
  • 1 medium head of cabbage
  • 2 lbs smoked sausage
  • 2 lbs fresh country sausage, partially frozen
  • 2 lbs boneless pork tenderloin
  • 3 pig stomachs
  • apple cider vinegar

Yield: serves 8 to 10 as a main course.

Preheat oven to 325°.

Shred the cabbage and place it in a large mixing bowl (or in the lid to your roasting pan). Peel and dice the potatoes. Add them to the cabbage.

Slice the smoked sausage into thin disks (about ¼” thick) and add it to the potatoes and cabbage. Slice the country sausage into thin disks and add it to the mixture. Slice the pork tenderloin into 1 ½” cubes and add it to the mixture.

Pennsylvania Dutch Pig Stomach Recipe (Hog Maw)

Pennsylvania Dutch Pig Stomach Recipe (Hog Maw)

With your hands, mix the potato, cabbage, and pork mixture until well combined.

Wash the pig stomachs under cold running water.

Place one pig stomach in a large roasting pan and stuff it with the potato, cabbage, and pork mixture. Continue this process until all three of the stomachs are stuffed. If the stomachs are stuffed and you have some of the mixture leftover, spread it across the bottom of the roasting pan and then place the stuffed pig stomachs on top of it.

Cover the roasting pan and bake for 4 hours until the hog maw is golden brown. The smoked sausage should be brown, too and the stomachs may split open while baking. If the stomachs appear dry while they are baking, you can baste them once or twice with pan juices.

Serve this Pennsylvania Dutch hog maw hot with cider vinegar drizzled over it. Enjoy!

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17 comments
Lisa
Lisa

Thanks for the recipe. Just butchered yesterday, we brought home the stomach and were hoping to find a recipe. I can't wait to try this!! Thanks again.

Jim Kauffman
Jim Kauffman

My family is originally from Pennsylvania, and I remember my grandmother making something similar to this when I was a kid. I am an avid cook and couldn't believe my luck when I found your recipes while looking for pressure cooker reviews (good review by the way-bought it). Made the pig stomach and it reminded me of home. Really tasty, yet such simple ingredients. Took a little effort to find the actual pig stomach, but turned out the butcher at our farmers market was able to get a couple for me. Can't say enough about how good it was. Thanks.

Susan with Permanent Posies
Susan with Permanent Posies

First.....I have never heard of it and I love to read about food I haven't heard of. Second....well.....I am not sure about pig's stomach...haha. I didn't know you could buy that. The results look delicious and I would love to try it. You had lots of visitors from Tuesday's Tasty Tidbits again this week....so....Hog Maw will be featured.

KB and Whitesnake
KB and Whitesnake

Never seen this before. Thanks for sharing with Simply Delish.

Miz Helen
Miz Helen

This is a very interesting dish, I actually have a friend who makes this I really need to try it sometime. My very best wishes to you and your family for a blessed Thanksgiving. Thanks for sharing with Full Plate Thursday and hope to see you again real soon! Miz Helen

Laurie
Laurie

Thanks for linking up to the Living Well Blog Hop. I had heard of Hog Maw, so I've learned something new today. It looks good.

Mrs B
Mrs B

Hi! Newly following from Foodie Friday! This looks so good... I wonder if a few layers of caul fat would work if we couldn't get the stomach? I'll certainly check with our butcher. Thanks for sharing such a great old traditional recipe!

Charlene@APinchofJoy
Charlene@APinchofJoy

Coming over from Miz Helen's -- just had to see if this was what I thought it was! Yep! Love these traditional recipes and love that they are still being used.

debbie
debbie

never used pigs stomach before, not sure where'd i get one! but it sure looks good!

Suzan
Suzan

I am a Pennsylvania Dutch girl and we make ours a little differently than yours. We use potatoes, carrots, smoked sausage, fresh sausage, onions and chopped celery. It is one of my favorite "old time" dishes. I love it with cabbage slaw and applesauce as side dishes. You made me hungry!

Emily
Emily

Hi! Came over from Made By You MOnday! This looks great! Would love for you to come over and link up to my Tasty Tuesday party going on now!

Christy
Christy

Jim, I am so glad you enjoyed this dish! Thanks for visiting toolsforkitchens! :)

Christy
Christy

Hi, Susan. I know...everyone says that about pig stomach...it is an odd ingredient that doesn't sound pretty. The stomach is just a casing and the end result is really fabulous. No different than sausage or some brands of hotdogs -- and we know what those casings really are! Thank you for featuring my recipe. :) Happy Thanksgiving!!

Christy
Christy

Hi, Miz Helen. Yes, try your friend's dish sometime. You'll love it! Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family!

Christy
Christy

Hi, Mrs. B. Your butcher or local farmers' market should have them, but if not, yes, try caul fat! Thanks for visiting!

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